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Mindful Meditation : Welcoming Means Sitting With the Blues

Updated: Mar 31

May you be happy. May you be healthy. May you be free of danger. May you be free of suffering and the causes of suffering. May you be peaceful, kind, wise, and skillful. May you be at ease.
Good morning heartache, you old gloomy sight. Good morning heartache thought we said goodbye last night. I tossed and turned until I thought you were gone, but here you are with the dawn.

Welcoming : As Reflected In The Art Form Known As “The Blues”

Whenever I listen to Billie Holiday sing “Good Morning Heartache” or other pieces that reflect the acceptance of the days reality as expressed by Black folks, I deepen my understanding of Welcoming in meditation. The blues is a genre of music re-articulated in the American South in the late 19th century from the African rhythms held deep within the souls of Black folks.

The blues has long been used as a form of self-expression, allowing us to express our emotions and experiences in a unique and powerful way. The blues has also been used as a form of healing and self-care, allowing Black folks to connect with their emotions and to find peace and comfort in the midst of their experience. To reconcile the unreconcilable by tapping into the divine.


This same tradition of self-expression and self-care can be found in the practice of welcoming. By opening up to our experience with curiosity and kindness, we can learn to observe our thoughts and feelings without judgment or attachment. This helps us to connect more deeply with our emotions and to find peace and comfort in our experience.


Introduction to Mindfulness and Welcoming

As our world becomes increasingly chaotic and uncertain, mindfulness meditation has become a popular way to find peace, clarity, and inner balance. Mindful meditation is a practice of paying attention to the present moment with an open and non-judgmental attitude, allowing us to become more aware of our thoughts, feelings, and physical sensations. It has been used for centuries as a tool for self-discovery and personal growth, and can help us to cultivate greater self-awareness and acceptance.


But what does it mean to truly be mindful? One key element of mindfulness is the concept of welcoming, or opening up to the present moment with curiosity and kindness.

The practice of mindful meditation can be broken down into two main components: awareness and acceptance. Awareness involves paying attention to the present moment and observing our thoughts, feelings, and physical sensations. Acceptance is the practice of accepting our thoughts and feelings without trying to change them or push them away. Together, these two components help us to stay more connected to the present moment and become more aware of our inner experience.


Mindful meditation is a powerful practice that can help us to cultivate a greater sense of clarity and inner peace. By focusing our attention on the present moment and allowing ourselves to be open to whatever arises, we can learn to observe our thoughts and feelings without judgment or attachment. This helps us to remain grounded in the here and now, instead of getting lost in worries about the future or regrets from the past.


The History of Welcoming in Mindful Meditation

The concept of welcoming has been around for centuries, though it has only recently become more widely known and practiced in mindful meditation. It is rooted in Eastern philosophy, particularly the philosophies of Buddhism and Hinduism. In Buddhism, the practice of mindfulness can be traced back to the teachings of the Buddha, who taught that we should cultivate mindful awareness of the present moment and accept our thoughts and feelings without judgment or attachment.


In Hinduism, the practice of welcoming is closely related to the concept of ahimsa, or non-harming. Ahimsa is the practice of treating ourselves and others with kindness and understanding, without judgment or attachment. Similarly, welcoming is the practice of opening up to the present moment and our experience with curiosity and kindness.


The Practice of Welcoming in Mindful Meditation

The practice of welcoming can be broken down into three main steps:

  1. Notice: Observe and acknowledge whatever arises in your experience, without judgment or attachment.

  2. Open: Open up to your experience with curiosity and kindness.

  3. Accept: Accept whatever arises in your experience without trying to change it or push it away.

By following these three steps, we can learn to observe our thoughts and feelings without judgment or attachment, allowing us to stay more connected to the present moment.


Applications of Welcoming in Mindful Meditation

The practice of welcoming can be applied to a wide variety of mindfulness practices, such as yoga, qigong, and tai chi. In yoga, the practice of welcoming can help us to stay more connected to our breath and our body, allowing us to cultivate a greater sense of awareness and acceptance. In qigong and tai chi, welcoming can help us to stay more focused on our movements and to cultivate a greater sense of balance and harmony.

The practice of welcoming can also be applied to other mindfulness practices, such as walking meditation and body scans. In walking meditation, welcoming can help us to stay more connected to our body and to the present moment. In body scans, welcoming can help us to observe our physical sensations without judgment or attachment, allowing us to cultivate a greater sense of awareness and acceptance.


Conclusion

In conclusion, the concept of welcoming is an important part of mindful meditation and can be a powerful tool for cultivating a greater sense of connection, understanding, and acceptance. By opening up to the present moment and whatever arises in our experience with curiosity and kindness, we can learn to observe our thoughts and feelings without judgment or attachment. This helps us to stay more connected to the present moment and to cultivate a greater sense of acceptance and understanding.


"Good morning heartache. Sit down".

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